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Sun Health

Four ancient sources of health

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SUN, SALT WATER AND EXERCISE
Exercise –Self reward with emotional, physical healing the bodies natural medicine
When GOD created the universe, he put self-rewarding system, you reap what you sow. This self-rewarding system is applicable to exercising for good health as you will see below.

WHAT IS EXERCISING
We all know that exercise is good for you, but when you understand why, it makes getting off the couch and into the gym a lot easier. Exercising is an activity requiring physical effort, carried out to sustain or improve health and fitness.

BENEFITS OF EXERCISING
Exercise makes you feel better in all sorts of ways. From the brain to the lungs, you benefit from a bit of exercise every day.

HEART
Your heart gets bigger and stronger your blood vessels become more elastic. That means your heart rate and blood pressure goes down, which decreases your risk for a number of diseases and gives you more energy.
Burns calories and fat, which contributes to weight loss.
Better control of blood sugar and lower blood cholesterol.

BRAIN
The increased blood flow also benefits your brain, allowing it to almost immediately function better. As a result, you tend to feel more focused after a workout.
Exercising regularly will promote the growth of new brain cells. These new brain cells help boost memory and learning.

WELL-BEING
Your brain releases chemicals called endorphins during exercise that alter your mood by increasing a feeling of well-being. Exercising is one of the most effective prevention and treatment strategies for depression
Exercise can help you to maintain healthy bone mass as you get older.
Unexpected side effects of exercise include improved sexual function. It is like becoming a virgin again, heightened sexual pleasure, clearer skin and improved mood and sleep.
Research shows that the “secret” to increased productivity and happiness on any given day is a long-term investment in regular exercise.

NEGATIVE IMPACT OF EXERCISING AND HOW TO DEAL WITH THEM
During exercise there is microscopic damage to their muscles each time they work out. It sounds bad, but it’s actually good. The muscle responds by repairing itself and that makes the muscle stronger than it was before.
The awful truth of exercise is that while it can make you feel better you’re going to feel pretty bad at beginning. It is called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).
Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness is the muscle pain that starts up to a day after unfamiliar exercise. That soreness usually lasts for 24-48 hours.
Severe pain, however, is considered abnormal. If it gets to a point where you can’t do the exercise again, you need to back off and lower the intensity. Take days off in-between exercises.
Stretching is the excellent way to deal with DOMS. Stretching is light intensity exercise that allows you to feel good and if you go back and seat down the pain will come back in my opinion eating and living without exercise is the source of most illnesses
One of the ways to support a healthy exercise regimen is to increase carbohydrate in addition to eating foods high in healthy fats, whole grains, fruits and vegetables.

HOW LONG SHOULD I EXERCISE
7-minutes full workout or the 20-minute workout
The best duration is 30-1 hour of moderate intensity workouts a day. Expect to feel healthier and stronger after two to three weeks of exercise.
Endorphin (the feel good natural chemical) levels might not increase at all until an hour after you’ve started working that is why the best exercise duration is 30 – 1 hour.
You get euphoria (emotional healing) like feeling when you exercise that’s the self reward,

NOTE; There has to be PHYSICAL EFFORT. You reap what you sow. No short cuts. If you eat and stay without exercising you are on the road to bad health.

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Sun Health

BoMRA warns of cancer-causing impurity

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Botswana Medicines Regulatory Authority (BoMRA) is investigating if ranitidine, a common heartburn medicine, has a chemical contamination, which could cause cancer.
The drug is also known as Zantac, Uptake, Austin and R-Lok.

BoMRA issued a warning recently following an announcement on September 13, by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that it had learned that some ranitidine medications, including those known by the brand name Zantac, contain low levels of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), an impurity that could cause cancer.

NDMA is a possible cancer-causing chemical linked to liver damage. Since last year, the FDA has been investigating NDMA and other impurities in blood pressure and heart failure medicines known as angiotensin receptor blockers or ARBs. However, the FDA cautioned that levels of the NDMA appeared low and not much higher than when the chemical is present in foods like processed or grilled meat. The FDA said: “Although NDMA may cause harm in large amounts, the levels the FDA is finding in ranitidine from preliminary tests barely exceed amounts you might expect to find in common foods”.

Over-the-counter ranitidine is approved to prevent and relieve heartburn and can be prescribed to prevent ulcers of the stomach and intestines. In a statement, BoMRA told people they could still keep taking the medicine or ask doctors to prescribe one of many drugs that treat heartburn or ulcers. The health product watchdog cautioned patients who had been prescribed Ranitidine from stopping without an alternative, advising patients instead to talk to their health professionals before they stop or switch to other medicines.

“BoMRA is urgently liaising with the registered suppliers of ranitidine-containing medicines to investigate the presence of NDMA in Botswana ranitidine products; and will update the public on the outcome of these investigations,” reads the statement.

BoMRA Spokesperson, Israel Kgosidiile said there is no evidence at this stage that the impurity has caused any harm to patients.
“There is no recommendation for patients who have ranitidine to stop taking it. If a patient has any questions they should speak to their doctor or pharmacist,“ he stated.

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Know Your Specialist

‘Cancer took away my boobs, not my life’

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Sun Health: What events led up to your diagnosis, or, how did you discover that you were suffering from cancer?

Mpho Kgaodi:My journey with Breast cancer started in 2012. Around April I felt a lump on my right breast. It was not painful at all, just slightly itchy. It was on the upper part of my breast. I ignored it for about three days but it kept nagging me and then I decided to go see my doctor. He also confirmed that there was a lump on my breast He sent me for mammogram that confirmed an abnormality on the structure of my right breast. I then went to see him with the results and he informed me that there are two ways to test that lump – Biopsy, which meant that he will be taking a piece of that lump to send it to the laboratory for examination and the other option was to totally remove the lump, Lumpectomy. I decided that he removes the whole lump, because I really didn’t want that Lump on my breast.

SH: We know that about 10% of all breast cancers are hereditary. Are there other women affected in your family?
MK: I don’t know of any other woman or even man in my family who has had cancer, though it is hereditary.

SH: What were your first thoughts when you received the diagnosis?
MK: I cried for a brief moment. I was overwhelmed with emotions, fear of death. I quickly recovered from that dreadful thought and remembered that I have a great husband and three boys. I felt that I had so much to live for.The doctor informed me about the options I had regarding treatment and he gave me time to think about it. I drove back home to Lobatse and by the time I arrived at my house, I had already made up my mind that I am going for total removal of the breast. I broke the news to my family and they were just as shocked as I was when the doctor broke the news to me. I explained to them my decision to go for surgery and they were very supportive. Few weeks later, I went for a mystectomy.

SH: How long were you in treatment

MK: The surgery was followed by Chemotherapy. The first time I walked into the oncology centre, I found so many people there already. I then realised that I am not the only person with cancer, it is so many of us. It gave me strength and courage. I had heard that the side effects of chemo are brutal, seeing those people made me realise that if others can do it so can I. I decided to go for it as I had so much will and spirit to stay alive and raise my kids. After the second session of chemo, I started losing my hair, nail beds turned black. I was never discouraged though, despite my aching body and the constant nausea after chemo. I had six cycles of it. In 2013 around April again, I experienced severe pain on my left breast, but with no Lump. My doctor again recommended I go for a mammogram. It confirmed cancer which was still at stage 1. I then insisted that they remove the breast. I would lose both my breasts but I knew staying alive for my boys was more important. Other people thought the pain was psychological, and I knew what I felt and my mind was made up. I had the second mastectomy and had to go through another cycle of chemo which I completed. I am now on oral medication. I take my tablet daily. It is recommended that I take it for ten years. I have just started on my year 6 on the tablet. I do go for regular check ups, to establish if the cancer is not back.

SH: What helped keep your spirits up and gave you support during this period?

MK: A good friend of mine and colleague told me about Journey of Hope Botswana. He introduced me to them, and I had tremendous support from them. I also went to Cancer Association Botswana to introduce myself. My family has also been my backbone, supporting me through it all. I am so greatful. On days that my spirits are low, I always take my mind to positive thoughts. I try to remind myself of the good times, sometimes I even find myself laughing out loud.

SH: How has this affected you at a psychological level?

MK: My life has not really changed for the worst. Like the saying “when life gives you lemons, make lemon aid out of them”. I lost my job after the second diagnosis of cancer. While this affected my family financially I never got discouraged, as this gave me time to take care of my family. I am a full time stay home mom. I walk this journey with my family. My boys understand that I had Cancer but now I am okay. They sometimes check if I have taken my medication, and they would even ask about my next appointment. I am blessed to have them.

SH: Facing the diagnosis of breast cancer is one of the most feared experiences in our society. What has been your experience as you worked with communities through Cancer Association of Botswana (CAB)?

MK: Working with CAB has been eye opening. Through motivational talks and other actives like the annual stiletto walk, the message has been positively received. There is still a lot to be done though, especially to make people understand that breast cancer is NOT a death sentence. So many lives can be saved.

SH: Amongst raising awareness, cancer awareness month is about celebrating individuals like yourself and their triumphs over cancer. Is there anything you would like to say to the community of cancer survivors and women in general?

MK: I have learnt so much from being diagnosed with cancer. I appreciate life more. I never used go and see a doctor without any pains or any thing “wrong” with my body. Now I do it regularly and so far I always get a clean bill of health. I encourage everybody to do regular self -breast examination. It is easy, convenient, cost-effective and can really help with early detection. I believe there is a lot to be done as far as breast cancer awareness. Remember men can also have breast cancer.

To all those who are going through cancer at the moment, remember you are not alone. Let’s walk this journey together. Let’s walk with Hope, Courage and Strength. There is life after cancer. Cancer took away my boobs it did not take my life. As October is breast cancer awareness, let’s support those affected, honour the survivors and remember the fallen.
PINK RIBBON ALWAYS

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