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‘Homosexuality is unAfrican’

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The homosexual debate is a contentious issue that often leaves tempers flaring. And this was the case at the Gaborone High Court last week when a bench of three judges Abednego Tafa, Jennifer Dube and Micheal Leburu, listened to arguments in the landmark case as the gay community continues to fight for national recognition and for Botswana government to revise the Constitution and decriminalise section 164 and 167, which refers to same-sex as unnatural sexual acts.

Advocacy group LEGAGIBO with the support of the Southern Africa Litigation Centre is challenging Botswana laws on homosexuality. Advocate Sydney Pilane is representing Attorney General in the matter. After arriving late in court from an earlier engagement at Lobatse High Court, Pilane stirred controversy when he argued that homosexuality is unAfrican and does not correlate with the traditional values of Batswana. “As things stand, Botswana is being forced to abandon its moral values. The courts should be conservative and measured,” he said. He also said that there was also no substantial evidence to indicate that Batswana’s views on homosexuality had softened in the past years.

He cited the Kanane case of 2004 before the Court of Appeal, which indicated that Batswana were hardened against acceptance and tolerance of homosexuals, adding that Penal Code provisions could be revisited when the time was right. He argued that there is no substantial evidence to back claims that Batswana’s attitudes towards homosexuality have changed, and that there is also no evidence that gays have been discriminated against. Pilane, who had a tongue-in-cheek demeanour, asked what was so important about ‘sex’ that homosexuals could “not do it” without upsetting the laws, saying that they were conducting their affairs behind closed doors anyways.

Pilane, who appeared to find humour in the proceedings, also claimed that gays in Botswana were not harassed like in other countries and wondered if people should rush to courts for every small gripe. Much to the amusement of the audience, he illustrated that people had mocked him about the size of his head since he was a kid and even in adulthood, to the extent that some created social media memes out of him but he did not cry about it. He also stated that gays would still get HIV and not use condoms even if homosexuality was decriminalised, in reference to a Ministry of Health report that stipulated that gays did not receive access to open health care since homosexuality is illegal. Pilane further wondered whether legalising homosexuality indicated to the public that there was room to change the law to accommodate “unnatural behaviour,” rhetorically asking: “Should those who partake in bestiality (sleep with animals) also come here and demand that laws be changed to accommodate them?”

Tshiamo Rantao, representing LEGAGIBO shot down Pilane’s arguments and said that he (Pilane) was peddling his own personal views. Rantao said the AG failed to prove that there is no evidence to repeal the law. Rantao made reference to the Rammonge case and the Yogyakarta Principles, arguing that sexual orientation is a matter of feelings and not choice. He argued that there is overwhelming research that there is widespread violence against homosexuals in Botswana. Rantao said that the question should be what the law is doing in people’s bedrooms to the extent that it defines what is an acceptable or unnatural sexual act.

Meanwhile, Gosego Lekgowe, also representing LEGAGIBO noted that there should be determination of whether Section 164 violates Constitutional provisions, adding that government should ascertain what the crime is about being sexually attracted to someone of the same sex. He noted that the right to dignity and privacy are rights that the Court must consider, as they are fundamental to the case, adding that there is a need to protect homosexuals, who are a prejudiced minority.

In May last year, a gay man filed a petition with the Gaborone High Court, arguing that sections 164 and 167 are unconstitutional and impede on gay rights, their access to appropriate health care, and social security. Judgment in the matter will be handed down on 11 June 2019.

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Church distances itself from Pastor who livestreamed his suicide

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Head Pastor at Metsimotlhabe Holiness Union Church France Koosimile has distanced his church from Phenyo Godfrey who committed suicide live on social media a week ago. Speaking to this publication this week, Koosimile said Godfrey was never a Pastor at Holiness church as assumed by many.

Godfrey, who goes by the name Bishop P Godfrey on social media, allegedly shot a video of himself committing suicide on Sunday evening. According to a few friends and those close to Godfrey, the deceased was from Molepolole and has been identified as a pastor at Holiness Union Church in Metsimotlhabe.

On the evening  of Sunday last week, he went live on Facebook and proceeded to put a rope around his neck. He was seen in the short video hanging by the neck until he took his last breath. TO READ THE FULL STORY, BUY THIS WEEK’S (11 August 2021)  PRINT EDITION OF THE MIDWEEK SUN AT A STORE NEAR YOU.

 

 

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Women challenged to step-up food production

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National Development Bank CEO, Lorato Morapedi has challenged women to take up more agribusiness ventures to cut down on the country’s food import bill.
With an annual P7 billion food import bill hanging over the country, Morapedi said women can significantly trim it down. “We need to get out of our comfort zones, let’s open our eyes and seize the opportunities,” said Morapedi, adding that women need to work in groups.
She emphasized that women should leverage on collective expertise found in clusters to grow the country’s food production sector.
“Grab the opportunities that exist with the food value chain,” she said, citing that women have been hard-hit by COVID-19 in their endeavors to put food on the table.
She further implored women not to shy away from finance development institutions (FDIs) to finance their projects. Morapedi bemoaned that a handful people are willing to go into food production despite the high import food bill that the country faces.
Very few people are doing food production; people are lazy to go into food production,” said Morapedi. She also highlighted that the country’s major supplier, South Africa is also not coping as COVID-19 challenges unravel.
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