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President Masire’s grandson, Eno, speaks politics, patriotism and relationship with Ndaba Gaolathe

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When he took to the podium and spoke at the funeral of his grandfather, former president Sir Ketumile Masire, Eno Mwaba undoubtedly caused most people to sit up and listen. Poised and articulate in the Queen’s language, he belied confidence and proved to be quite the storyteller; he held the spellbound attentive audience captive as he regaled them with anecdotes about his relationship with Masire. A few hours later, he was “trending” on social media. Here was this cute young guy who is #bae goals – confident, handsome, well-read, well-travelled and educated.

The Eno tagging and swooning went on for a few days thereafter. Nearly six months after the funeral, this reporter finally caught up with him after a bit of a chase. First things first: What does ‘Eno’ mean, I ask. He says that he was told that it means ‘listen.’ Strangely, he insists that whatever it means, that it is a Setswana name. During his speech at Masire’s funeral, Mwamba, who is still based overseas, insinuated that he would like to follow in the footsteps of his grandfather as well as his mother, Mmasekgoa Masire-Mwaba and be active in leadership. His response is well-calculated and intelligent. “Botswana politics is something I have grown up with all my life. Dinner table conversations were always dominated by current political affairs.

I believe there is simply no denying that politics is in my blood, so I shall definitely be active. It’s every citizen’s responsibility to be politically engaged, and ensure they hold their leaders accountable for their actions,” he says. He waxes philosophically when asked whether he would follow in the footsteps of his grandfather. “Sir Ketumile Masire was a gentleman, a statesman, a God-fearing man and a humble man. His virtues and values helped build the infrastructure, and environment conducive for economic prosperity, hence Botswana was the fastest growing economy in the 1980’s during his presidency. “What a legacy, and one I certainly do look up to for inspiration. His memory and legacy is what motivates me to work so hard!

I am extremely proud of him, so I will ensure that my life is one that does his legacy justice, and permits other people to feel similar pride in me,” he says. Mwamba points out that he is a keen networker who has engaged most of our local politicians and other top brass. In fact, he says Alliance for Progressives leader Ndaba Gaolathe is his mentor and a family friend. “We are close. I respect him, and love engaging with him.” Mwamba is patriotic and says Botswana has potential to grow, provided we keep on par with global changes.

“Economies of the past are being rendered redundant through various technological advances; just look at what the digital camera did to Kodak? “Therefore if Botswana is to compete, we need to ensure our people are technologically engaged. We are landlocked, so our manufacturing and exporting industries will always have a subtle dependency upon our international relations. Technology is the future, and such advantages in this space, is where we will advance into excellence.” Mwamba says that he is a proud Motswana and the one thing he appreciates about Batswana is that they are loving people. He comes from an interesting lineage of leadership (Sir Ketumile Masire) and what important lessons has he learnt from him? He responds: “My grandfather once said to me, that the definition of prime minister draws its origin from the Latin phrase primus inter pares, which basically means first among equals. He went on to explain how the term minister in the biblical sense, basically equates to servant.

“Therefore one should see prime minister, as the first servant, as all leaders are servants to their people. This was the first lesson, over what it means to lead. You are there to serve and not be served.” Mwamba visits Botswana regularly but is currently growing professionally working in the biggest financial centre in the world. “But my wealth and investments are in Botswana.” While he currently works in London, he intends to further his studies in America, and travel more. “We live in an increasingly globalised world, and international exposure particularly at the highest levels, is something I feel leaders of the future will need to meaningfully engage with this interconnected global village we live in today.” Mwamba is cagey and doesn’t want to divulge much on whether he is rooting for any political position and prefers to keep everyone guessing.

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Church distances itself from Pastor who livestreamed his suicide

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Head Pastor at Metsimotlhabe Holiness Union Church France Koosimile has distanced his church from Phenyo Godfrey who committed suicide live on social media a week ago. Speaking to this publication this week, Koosimile said Godfrey was never a Pastor at Holiness church as assumed by many.

Godfrey, who goes by the name Bishop P Godfrey on social media, allegedly shot a video of himself committing suicide on Sunday evening. According to a few friends and those close to Godfrey, the deceased was from Molepolole and has been identified as a pastor at Holiness Union Church in Metsimotlhabe.

On the evening  of Sunday last week, he went live on Facebook and proceeded to put a rope around his neck. He was seen in the short video hanging by the neck until he took his last breath. TO READ THE FULL STORY, BUY THIS WEEK’S (11 August 2021)  PRINT EDITION OF THE MIDWEEK SUN AT A STORE NEAR YOU.

 

 

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Women challenged to step-up food production

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National Development Bank CEO, Lorato Morapedi has challenged women to take up more agribusiness ventures to cut down on the country’s food import bill.
With an annual P7 billion food import bill hanging over the country, Morapedi said women can significantly trim it down. “We need to get out of our comfort zones, let’s open our eyes and seize the opportunities,” said Morapedi, adding that women need to work in groups.
She emphasized that women should leverage on collective expertise found in clusters to grow the country’s food production sector.
“Grab the opportunities that exist with the food value chain,” she said, citing that women have been hard-hit by COVID-19 in their endeavors to put food on the table.
She further implored women not to shy away from finance development institutions (FDIs) to finance their projects. Morapedi bemoaned that a handful people are willing to go into food production despite the high import food bill that the country faces.
Very few people are doing food production; people are lazy to go into food production,” said Morapedi. She also highlighted that the country’s major supplier, South Africa is also not coping as COVID-19 challenges unravel.
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