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President Masire’s grandson, Eno, speaks politics, patriotism and relationship with Ndaba Gaolathe

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When he took to the podium and spoke at the funeral of his grandfather, former president Sir Ketumile Masire, Eno Mwaba undoubtedly caused most people to sit up and listen. Poised and articulate in the Queen’s language, he belied confidence and proved to be quite the storyteller; he held the spellbound attentive audience captive as he regaled them with anecdotes about his relationship with Masire. A few hours later, he was “trending” on social media. Here was this cute young guy who is #bae goals – confident, handsome, well-read, well-travelled and educated.

The Eno tagging and swooning went on for a few days thereafter. Nearly six months after the funeral, this reporter finally caught up with him after a bit of a chase. First things first: What does ‘Eno’ mean, I ask. He says that he was told that it means ‘listen.’ Strangely, he insists that whatever it means, that it is a Setswana name. During his speech at Masire’s funeral, Mwamba, who is still based overseas, insinuated that he would like to follow in the footsteps of his grandfather as well as his mother, Mmasekgoa Masire-Mwaba and be active in leadership. His response is well-calculated and intelligent. “Botswana politics is something I have grown up with all my life. Dinner table conversations were always dominated by current political affairs.

I believe there is simply no denying that politics is in my blood, so I shall definitely be active. It’s every citizen’s responsibility to be politically engaged, and ensure they hold their leaders accountable for their actions,” he says. He waxes philosophically when asked whether he would follow in the footsteps of his grandfather. “Sir Ketumile Masire was a gentleman, a statesman, a God-fearing man and a humble man. His virtues and values helped build the infrastructure, and environment conducive for economic prosperity, hence Botswana was the fastest growing economy in the 1980’s during his presidency. “What a legacy, and one I certainly do look up to for inspiration. His memory and legacy is what motivates me to work so hard!

I am extremely proud of him, so I will ensure that my life is one that does his legacy justice, and permits other people to feel similar pride in me,” he says. Mwamba points out that he is a keen networker who has engaged most of our local politicians and other top brass. In fact, he says Alliance for Progressives leader Ndaba Gaolathe is his mentor and a family friend. “We are close. I respect him, and love engaging with him.” Mwamba is patriotic and says Botswana has potential to grow, provided we keep on par with global changes.

“Economies of the past are being rendered redundant through various technological advances; just look at what the digital camera did to Kodak? “Therefore if Botswana is to compete, we need to ensure our people are technologically engaged. We are landlocked, so our manufacturing and exporting industries will always have a subtle dependency upon our international relations. Technology is the future, and such advantages in this space, is where we will advance into excellence.” Mwamba says that he is a proud Motswana and the one thing he appreciates about Batswana is that they are loving people. He comes from an interesting lineage of leadership (Sir Ketumile Masire) and what important lessons has he learnt from him? He responds: “My grandfather once said to me, that the definition of prime minister draws its origin from the Latin phrase primus inter pares, which basically means first among equals. He went on to explain how the term minister in the biblical sense, basically equates to servant.

“Therefore one should see prime minister, as the first servant, as all leaders are servants to their people. This was the first lesson, over what it means to lead. You are there to serve and not be served.” Mwamba visits Botswana regularly but is currently growing professionally working in the biggest financial centre in the world. “But my wealth and investments are in Botswana.” While he currently works in London, he intends to further his studies in America, and travel more. “We live in an increasingly globalised world, and international exposure particularly at the highest levels, is something I feel leaders of the future will need to meaningfully engage with this interconnected global village we live in today.” Mwamba is cagey and doesn’t want to divulge much on whether he is rooting for any political position and prefers to keep everyone guessing.

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BMC secures beef market in Seychelles

Dikarabo Ramadubu

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Botswana Meat Commission (BMC) will soon start to sell its beef to the Island of Seychelles. Not only will they sell frozen raw meat, but will also send corned beef for trial in the Island.

All this is thanks to last week’s visit by President Mokgweetsi Masisi who included in his delegation executive management of the BMC, led by Chief Executive Officer, Dr Akolang Tombale.
The agreement signed between BMC and two leading Seychelles companies, will see BMC exporting at least 48 tonnes of raw beef to the island possibly from October. The names of the two companies that BMC signed an agreement with are Seychelles Trading Company which is a quasi-government organisation, and Rosebelle Company which is privately owned.

Although both have agreed to trade with each other, BMC cannot start immediately, as they have to wait for the green light from Seychelles companies who still have to apply for import permits in accordance with the law of their republic.

Speaking to The Midweek Sun, Tombale expressed gratitude that they managed to get good business in Seychelles through the assistance of President Masisi. “We are ready to export any time from now. As you know Seychelles is an island surrounded by mountains and cannot produce much if not anything. “They therefore depend much on imports even from as far as Brazil and Europe. Their economy is driven by tourism and they do not differ much with the European market in terms of the demand for beef as most tourists come from Europe and United States.”

Dr. Tombale said they agreed with the two companies that since “we are not sure about the logistics we will start by selling 24tonnes to each company per month, meaning we will be supplying the Island with a total of 48 tonnes per month. The idea is to start small and grow bigger as the people get used to our beef.” BMC has also negotiated to sell small stock meat to Seychelles and successfully negotiated for local chicken farmers to start selling their range chicken to Seychelles as well.

According to Tombale, he negotiated the deal after being approached by local chicken farmers amongst them Kgosi Mosadi Seboko of Balete, who requested that “we should try to find a market for chicken farmers as we go around the world searching for the beef market.” Tombale revealed that for a start both range chickens and small stock will not be supplied in tonnes or large quantities as they will be sold on a trial basis.

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G-west community reunion-walk a resounding success

Keletso Thobega

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Multitudes turned up for the Mosengwaketsi community walk and braai session this past Saturday in Gaborone West. The walk was held in the morning and was preceded by football games and a braai session that went on until late in the evening.

According to the event director Tshenolo Palai, the aim of the community day event was to revive community spirit and address crime and social ills. “The Mosengwaketsi community reunion will be held not only to create a platform to build unity but also address the social ill of passion killings,” he said.

Palai said that they had also invited health stakeholders for a wellness segment because they had realised that there are many health related conditions that affect the quality of people’s lives hence they had joined forces with religious organisations, the business community, neighbourhood outreach policing and other stakeholders in the area to encourage a culture of unity and create dialogue between all the parties.

He noted that they had wanted to create a relaxed environment conducive for different people to engage and strengthen their networks. He said they were also concerned with the high rate of crimes of passion in Botswana and also wanted to create a platform for both men and women to open up on issues that affect them because most people tend to be more relaxed in a social setting.

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